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OSHA Lead Awareness Training Online
for General Industry

Inhaling or ingesting unsafe levels of lead at work can put you at risk for organ damage, chronic health conditions or death. This online course for general industry workers explains the dangers of lead exposure and the most effective ways to avoid harmful exposures in the workplace.

The course provides an overview of the OSHA lead standard for general industry (29 CFR 1910.1025), including key safety controls, permissible exposure limits and other important topics.

Who Needs Lead Awareness Training for General Industry?

According to the OSHA lead standard for general industry, lead awareness training is mandatory for any worker who may be exposed to harmful levels of lead on the job.

General industry workers at risk for lead exposure are also required to retake lead awareness training annually. This helps ensure workers remain up to date on the dangers of lead poisoning and important safety controls. The date that you completed your training or annual retraining will be printed on your digital Certificate of Completion.

Lead Awareness Training Course Details

SST Standards

Satisfies Training Standards for:

29 CFR 1910.1025

Industry Workers

Designed for:

General industry workers

NY DOB

Format:

100% online course

Certification Icon

Provides:

Instant digital Certificate of Completion

Benefits of Online Lead Awareness Training

Our online Lead Awareness Training for General Industry course has numerous benefits, including:

  • 100% online course
  • Meets OSHA training requirement under 29 CFR 1910.1025
  • Satisfies OSHA's annual retraining requirement
  • Instantly download your Certificate of Completion
  • Train at your own pace

Once you finish the course and pass a brief test on the core topics, you can instantly download your Certificate of Completion. Lead Awareness Training for General Industry takes about one hour to complete.

Learning Objectives for the Lead Awareness Course

The primary goal of this course is to teach you how to avoid health risks associated with lead exposure. You will learn how lead exposure occurs at general industry jobsites and how employers monitor and control lead hazards.

Key topics covered in the course include:

  • Risks associated with lead exposure
  • OSHA's lead standard for general industry (29 CFR 1910.1025)
  • The permissible exposure limit for lead
  • Lead hazard controls
  • Monitoring for lead exposure
  • Medical surveillance and recordkeeping

Lead Awareness Training for General Industry is ideal for any general industry worker who faces lead exposure risks on the job.

Lead Poisoning and OSHA Training FAQs

Does OSHA Require Lead Awareness Training?

Yes. According to OSHA's lead standard for general industry (29 CFR 1910.1025), "The employer shall train each employee who is subject to exposure to lead at or above the action level, or for whom the possibility of skin or eye irritation exists, in accordance with the requirements of this section. The employer shall institute a training program and ensure employee participation in the program."

OSHA's lead action level is 30 μg/m3, or 30 micrograms of airborne lead per cubic meter of air averaged over an eight-hour period. If a jobsite exposes workers to this level of airborne lead, regardless of respirator use, OSHA requires worker training and additional compliance activities.

How Do You Get Lead Poisoning?

Lead poisoning can occur when a person is exposed to air, soil, water or substances that are contaminated with lead. Workers may develop lead poisoning after workplace exposures to lead found in paint, soil, dust, batteries, solder, pipes and a variety of other materials.

According to Mayo Clinic, even small traces of lead can cause severe health problems over time. The substance can build up in the body over months or years. As more lead accumulates over time, the likelihood of serious health problems increases.

What Is OSHA's Lead Action Level?

The lead action level is 30 μg/m3, or 30 micrograms of airborne lead per cubic meter of air averaged over an eight-hour period.

When lead concentrations reach this level at a jobsite, OSHA requires employers to train workers on lead hazards and perform specific compliance activities.

What Is OSHA's Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) for Lead?

The permissible exposure limit of lead is 50 μg/m3, or 50 micrograms of airborne lead per cubic meter of air averaged over an eight-hour period. According to OSHA regulations, this is the maximum concentration of lead that workers can be exposed to on the job.

Does Lead Awareness Training Expire?

Yes. According to OSHA's lead standard for general industry, workers are required to repeat their lead awareness training each year. When you complete our online lead awareness course, you will receive a digital Certificate of Completion that lists the date you finished your training.

Does the Course Satisfy Lead Training Requirements for Other Industries?

No, this course applies specifically to general industry training standards outlined in 29 CFR 1910.1025. OSHA has separate standards and training requirements for construction and agricultural workers who face on-the-job exposures to lead.

The Lead Awareness Training for General Industry course is designed for general industry workers and does not cover specific hazards or training requirements for construction or agricultural workers.

How Can Employers Protect Workers from Lead Exposure?

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recommends a variety of measures that workers and employers can take to avoid lead exposure, including:

  • Ensure that all workers at risk for lead exposure complete lead awareness training and annual retraining
  • Survey the jobsite to identify all items and materials that contain lead
  • Monitor the level of lead in the air and create a lead monitoring program for any employees who were exposed to lead
  • Replace products that contain lead with lead-free alternatives or materials with a lower lead content
  • Confirm that work areas are properly ventilated and follow OSHA's recommended engineering controls
  • Ensure workers have access to appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE), including respiratory protection, eye protection, coveralls and gloves
  • Provide workers with lead removal products, such as wipes designed to remove lead from the skin

Related Courses

OSHA Education Center provides a variety of other online certificate courses for general industry workers, including: